Webinars

    • Energy Efficiency in Smart Buildings Through IoT Sensor Integration, IEEE PES Macedonia Chapter Talk, July 16, 2020
    • Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables, IEEE UKRI Section talk, July 16, 2020
    • Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues, IEEE PES Chapter Indonesia, July 17, 2020
    • Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues, IEEE Kerala Section Talk, July 22, 2020
    • Energy Efficiency in Smart Buildings Through IoT Sensor Integration, IEEE/SAIEEE, South Africa, July 22, 2020
    • Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables, IEEE Bhubaneswar Sub-section and IEEE PES Bhubaneswar Chapter, July 25, 2020
    • Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables, IEEE Brazil-Bahia Section Talk, July 27, 2020
    • Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues, IEEE UKRI Section, July 29, 2020
    • How to Write an Effective Technical Paper, IEEE Bhubaneswar Sub-section and IEEE PES Bhubaneswar Chapter, August 8, 2020
    • Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables, IEEE/SSAIEE, August 13, 2020

Date

Webinar Description

Webinar Presentation

28 May 2020
China

An Energy Internet Platform for Sensor-driven Transactive Energy Applications
IEEE PES China Chapters’ Council

For over a century, the structure of the electric utility business has been a supplier-driven model with consumers receiving and paying for electricity without any participation in how the electricity is produced, transmitted, or delivered.  However, advances in renewable energy technologies…

(e.g., PV panels), battery storage, smart devices, as well as financing models have given rise to prosumers – electricity consumers – who can produce energy from rooftop PV while also consuming from the grid. However, there are no widely available and effective tools to facilitate consumer participation in the energy market. A software platform, called the “Energy Internet” (EI) platform, is being developed at Virginia Tech, which uses the blockchain technology to securely manage data, communications, and control of devices among different participants on a large scale. Specifically, the focus is on these issues: (i) integration with power management systems; (ii) scalability of the technology; and (iii) cybersecurity capabilities. This structure allows the development and testing of a functioning energy internet platform for transactive energy and demand response applications. This cyber physical platform can help to design and develop a local smart electricity market where even small prosumers can contribute to a market-oriented power system.
Read more

03 June 2020
Singapore

An Energy Internet Platform for Sensor-driven Transactive Energy Applications
IEEE Singapore Section

For over a century, the structure of the electric utility business has been a supplier-driven model with consumers receiving and paying for electricity without any participation in how the electricity is produced, transmitted, or delivered. However, advances in renewable energy technologies (e.g., PV panels), battery storage, smart devices, as well as financing models have given rise to prosumers – electricity consumers – who can produce energy from rooftop PV while also consuming from the grid. However, there are no widely available and effective tools to facilitate consumer participation in the energy market. A software platform, called the “Energy Internet” (EI) platform, is being developed at Virginia Tech, which uses the blockchain technology to securely manage data, communications, and control of devices among different participants on a large scale… 

Specifically, the focus is on these issues: (i) integration with power management systems; (ii) scalability of the technology; and (iii) cybersecurity capabilities. This structure allows the development and testing of a functioning energy internet platform for transactive energy and demand response applications. This cyber physical platform can help to design and develop a local smart electricity market where even small prosumers can contribute to a market-oriented power system.
Read more

06 June 2020
Bangladesh

Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues
IEEE Tensymp Conference, Bangladesh

China, US, India, Japan and Russia are the top five countries in terms of electricity generation capacity. Between them they had a total capacity of 3,650 million kW in 2016. In terms of fuel sources for electricity coal, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, renewables and oil provided 38.3%, 22.9%, 16.3%, 10.2%, 9% and 3.3% respectively in 2017. This means almost two-thirds of the global electricity production came from fossil fuels in that year…

This is reflected in about 10 billion tons of CO2 from electricity generation or about a third of the global production. However, this mix is expected to change significantly in the next 10 years. By 2030 installed power generation capacities from wind, solar PV, hydro power, nuclear and thermal are going to reach 540 GW, 420 GW, 530 GW, 160 GW and 1200 GW respectively. The top five CO2 emitting countries are: China, United States, India, Russian Federation and Japan each producing between nine and one billion metric tons of CO2 in 2016. However, CO2 is not the only concern against global warming. The Global Warming Potentials (GWP) of greenhouse gases are as follows: CO2 (1), Methane (28), Hydro fluorocarbons (138), Nitrous oxide (265), Per fluorocarbons (6,630) and Sulphur hexafluoride (23,500). So, the bottom line is: Efforts in the electric power sector to replace fossil fuel with renewables and nuclear will help. But if emission from the transportation sector continues to rise, the drop in power sector contributions will not be enough. Large scale Electric Vehicle deployment will help, but question remains – how will the EV be powered.
Read more

13 June 2020
India

An IoT Platform for Building Energy Efficiency Applications
IEEE Virtual Symposium, India

Internet of Things (IoT) deployments offer a much higher value proposition if these can function in the context of smart buildings. Such advanced information and communication technology (ICT) applications in commercial buildings, schools, libraries, shopping centers, etc. offer low cost but highly effective monitoring and control opportunities…

Sensors deployed in key locations can monitor the building environment in real-time, collect information for intelligent decision making, and facilitate various services. An IoT sensor platform has been developed that provides a unified communication platform which can integrate information from disparate sources and provide one control hierarchy. It is a powerful, low-cost, open-architecture software platform that can monitor and control major electrical loads (e.g., HVAC, lighting and plug loads), as well as solar PV systems, energy storage units and other IoT sensors in commercial buildings. The platform can provide new or legacy buildings with a building automation system (BAS) or connect with existing BAS systems in large and small commercial buildings. This platform leverages machine learning algorithms to draw insights from a deployed building’s historical operating data and occupant preferences to save energy (kWh) while increasing occupant comfort. This also allows buildings to reduce peak demand (kW) through direct communication with utilities using demand response protocols such as openADR.
Read more

 

19 June 2020
Kenya

An IoT Platform for Building Energy Efficiency Applications
IEEE PES Student Branch Chapter, JKUAT, Kenya

Internet of Things (IoT) deployments offer a much higher value proposition if these can function in the context of smart buildings. Such advanced information and communication technology (ICT) applications in commercial buildings, schools, libraries, shopping centers, etc. offer low cost but highly effective monitoring and control opportunities…

Sensors deployed in key locations can monitor the building environment in real-time, collect information for intelligent decision making, and facilitate various services. An IoT sensor platform has been developed that provides a unified communication platform which can integrate information from disparate sources and provide one control hierarchy. It is a powerful, low-cost, open-architecture software platform that can monitor and control major electrical loads (e.g., HVAC, lighting and plug loads), as well as solar PV systems, energy storage units and other IoT sensors in commercial buildings. The platform can provide new or legacy buildings with a building automation system (BAS) or connect with existing BAS systems in large and small commercial buildings. This platform leverages machine learning algorithms to draw insights from a deployed building’s historical operating data and occupant preferences to save energy (kWh) while increasing occupant comfort. This also allows buildings to reduce peak demand (kW) through direct communication with utilities using demand response protocols such as openADR.
Read more

 

20 June 2020
India

Energy Efficiency in Smart Buildings Through IoT Sensor Integration
Maharaj Surajmal Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India

Internet of Things (IoT) deployments offer a much higher value proposition if these can function in the context of smart buildings. Such advanced information and communication technology (ICT) applications in commercial buildings, schools, libraries, shopping centers, etc. offer low cost but highly effective monitoring and control opportunities. Sensors deployed in key locations can monitor the building environment in real-time, collect information for intelligent decision making, and facilitate various services…

An IoT sensor platform has been developed that provides a unified communication platform which can integrate information from disparate sources and provide one control hierarchy. It is a powerful, low-cost, open-architecture software platform that can monitor and control major electrical loads (e.g., HVAC, lighting and plug loads), as well as solar PV systems, energy storage units and other IoT sensors in commercial buildings. The platform can provide new or legacy buildings with a building automation system (BAS) or connect with existing BAS systems in large and small commercial buildings. This platform leverages machine learning algorithms to draw insights from a deployed building’s historical operating data and occupant preferences to save energy (kWh) while increasing occupant comfort. This also allows buildings to reduce peak demand (kW) through direct communication with utilities using demand response protocols such as openADR.
Read more

21 June 2020
India

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE India Council, India

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation. …

In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

23 June 2020
Irkutsk, Russia

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE PES Russia Webinar Irkutsk

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency.  It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation…

In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

24 June 2020
Kerala, India

Opportunities for Power Engineers and Expectations from Power Engineers: A Global Perspective 
IPECS Conference, Kerala, India

The electrical revolution of the 1880s gave rise to two major areas of electrical engineering, namely wired telecommunications and power generation.  The early beginnings of wired and wireless telegraphy have evolved to radio, fiber optics, microwave and satellite-based communications while telephony is now taken over by the ubiquitous smart phone technology.  Similarly, the traditional power system consisting of generation, transmission and distribution has evolved rapidly over the past few decades to encompass new paradigms such as renewable energy, distributed generation, energy storage and electric vehicles, etc.  More importantly, communications has become the key enabling technology for the new power system. …

The need to generate and distribute electricity efficiently has given rise to distribution automation, and hence the creation of the smart grid.  On the end-user side, the need to utilize electricity efficiently has given rise to the concepts of smart cities and smart buildings practicing a range of energy saving measures such as demand response, IoT and sensor-based building energy management and renewables integration. 

Power engineers are expected to re-imagine the power system of today as a complex ecosystem comprising smart entities, i.e., buildings, campuses, cities, infrastructures and grids.  They will need to be familiar and conversant with these new paradigms and communications technologies as well as the various enabling technologies.

Read more

24 June 2020
Columbus,Ohio

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE PES Columbus Chapter

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. Many believe that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to
enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation. In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks …

It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.

Event Details

Date & Time: June 24th, 2020 5:00 – 6:10 PM (US Eastern Time)
RSVP thru https://events.vtools.ieee.org/event/register/231981
Alternatively, email xwu@aep.com

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Meeting number: 126 872 0677
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Join by video system
Dial 1268720677@meetingsamer22.webex.com
You can also dial 173.243.2.68 and enter your meeting number.
Join by phone
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Access code: 126 872 0677

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27 June 2020
New Delhi, India

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE Delhi Section and IEEE PES-IAS & PELS-IAS Delhi Chapter talk

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation. …

In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

28 June 2020
New Delhi, India

How to Write an Effective Technical Paper
IEEE Delhi Section & IEEE PES-IAS, PELS-IAS & Education Society Delhi Chapter talk

In this presentation Prof. Saifur Rahman will highlight issues with paper structure, conference vs. journal papers, ethics, where to publish, open access, impact factor, etc. He will also highlight the IEEE publications business, the value and quality of IEEE publications, and the broad topical areas IEEE publications cover.

29 June 2020
Jordan

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE Al Balqa Applied University Student Branch, Jordan

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation. …

In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

30 June 2020
Peru

Energy Efficiency in Smart Buildings Through IoT Sensor Integration
IEEE PES Peru Chapter

Internet of Things (IoT) deployments offer a much higher value proposition if these can function in the context of smart buildings. Such advanced information and communication technology (ICT) applications in commercial buildings, schools, libraries, shopping centers, etc. offer low cost but highly effective monitoring and control opportunities…

Sensors deployed in key locations can monitor the building environment in real-time, collect information for intelligent decision making, and facilitate various services. An IoT sensor platform has been developed that provides a unified communication platform which can integrate information from disparate sources and provide one control hierarchy. It is a powerful, low-cost, open-architecture software platform that can monitor and control major electrical loads (e.g., HVAC, lighting and plug loads), as well as solar PV systems, energy storage units and other IoT sensors in commercial buildings. The platform can provide new or legacy buildings with a building automation system (BAS) or connect with existing BAS systems in large and small commercial buildings. This platform leverages machine learning algorithms to draw insights from a deployed building’s historical operating data and occupant preferences to save energy (kWh) while increasing occupant comfort. This also allows buildings to reduce peak demand (kW) through direct communication with utilities using demand response protocols such as openADR.
Read more

03 July 2020
Bangalore, India

An Energy Internet Platform for Sensor-driven Transactive Energy Applications
IEEE Connect Conference, Bangalore, India

For over a century, the structure of the electric utility business has been a supplier-driven model with consumers receiving and paying for electricity without any participation in how the electricity is produced, transmitted, or delivered. However, advances in renewable energy technologies (e.g., PV panels), battery storage, smart devices, as well as financing models have given rise to prosumers – electricity consumers – who can produce energy from rooftop PV while also consuming from the grid…

However, there are no widely available and effective tools to facilitate consumer participation in the energy market. A software platform, called the “Energy Internet” (EI) platform, is being developed at Virginia Tech, which uses the blockchain technology to securely manage data, communications, and control of devices among different participants on a large scale. Specifically, the focus is on these issues: (i) integration with power management systems; (ii) scalability of the technology; and (iii) cybersecurity capabilities. This structure allows the development and testing of a functioning energy internet platform for transactive energy and demand response applications. This cyber physical platform can help to design and develop a local smart electricity market where even small prosumers can contribute to a market-oriented power system.
Read more

07 July 2020
Hungary

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE Hungary Section talk

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation…

In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

07 July 2020
Colombia

How to Write an Effective Technical Paper
IEEE PES Colombia Chapter talk

In this presentation Prof. Saifur Rahman will highlight issues with paper structure, conference vs. journal papers, ethics, where to publish, open access, impact factor, etc. He will also highlight the IEEE publications business, the value and quality of IEEE publications, and the broad topical areas IEEE publications cover.

09 July 2020
Australia

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE Australia PES Chapters talk

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation…

In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

09 July 2020
South Africa

Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues
IEEE/SAIEEE South Africa

China, US, India, Japan and Russia are the top five countries in terms of electricity generation capacity. Between them they had a total capacity of 3,650 million kW in 2016. In terms of fuel sources for electricity coal, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, renewables and oil provided 38.3%, 22.9%, 16.3%, 10.2%, 9% and 3.3% respectively in 2017. This means almost two-thirds of the global electricity production came from fossil fuels in that year…

This is reflected in about 10 billion tons of CO2 from electricity generation or about a third of the global production.  However, this mix is expected to change significantly in the next 10 years. By 2030 installed power generation capacities from wind, solar PV, hydro power, nuclear and thermal are going to reach 540 GW, 420 GW, 530 GW, 160 GW and 1200 GW respectively.  The top five CO2 emitting countries are: China, United States, India, Russian Federation and Japan each producing between nine and one billion metric tons of CO2 in 2016. However, CO2 is not the only concern against global warming. The Global Warming Potentials (GWP) of greenhouse gases are as follows: CO2 (1), Methane (28), Hydro fluorocarbons (138), Nitrous oxide (265), Per fluorocarbons (6,630) and Sulphur hexafluoride (23,500).  So, the bottom line is: Efforts in the electric power sector to replace fossil fuel with renewables and nuclear will help. But if emission from the transportation sector continues to rise, the drop in power sector contributions will not be enough. Large scale Electric Vehicle deployment will help, but question remains – how will the EV be powered.
Read more

10 July 2020
Paraguay

Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues
IEEE PES Chapter Paraguay

China, US, India, Japan and Russia are the top five countries in terms of electricity generation capacity. Between them they had a total capacity of 3,650 million kW in 2016. In terms of fuel sources for electricity coal, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, renewables and oil provided 38.3%, 22.9%, 16.3%, 10.2%, 9% and 3.3% respectively in 2017. This means almost two-thirds of the global electricity production came from fossil fuels in that year…

This is reflected in about 10 billion tons of CO2 from electricity generation or about a third of the global production. However, this mix is expected to change significantly in the next 10 years. By 2030 installed power generation capacities from wind, solar PV, hydro power, nuclear and thermal are going to reach 540 GW, 420 GW, 530 GW, 160 GW and 1200 GW respectively. The top five CO2 emitting countries are: China, United States, India, Russian Federation and Japan each producing between nine and one billion metric tons of CO2 in 2016. However, CO2 is not the only concern against global warming. The Global Warming Potentials (GWP) of greenhouse gases are as follows: CO2 (1), Methane (28), Hydro fluorocarbons (138), Nitrous oxide (265), Per fluorocarbons (6,630) and Sulphur hexafluoride (23,500). So, the bottom line is: Efforts in the electric power sector to replace fossil fuel with renewables and nuclear will help. But if emission from the transportation sector continues to rise, the drop in power sector contributions will not be enough. Large scale Electric Vehicle deployment will help, but question remains – how will the EV be powered.
Read more

12 July 2020
Chennai, India

An IoT Platform for Building Energy Efficiency Applications
IEEE Student Branch, SJCE, Chennai, India

Internet of Things (IoT) deployments offer a much higher value proposition if these can function in the context of smart buildings. Such advanced information and communication technology (ICT) applications in commercial buildings, schools, libraries, shopping centers, etc. offer low cost but highly effective monitoring and control opportunities. Sensors deployed in key locations can monitor the building environment in real-time, collect information for intelligent decision making, and facilitate various services…

An IoT sensor platform has been developed that provides a unified communication platform which can integrate information from disparate sources and provide one control hierarchy. It is a powerful, low-cost, open-architecture software platform that can monitor and control major electrical loads (e.g., HVAC, lighting and plug loads), as well as solar PV systems, energy storage units and other IoT sensors in commercial buildings. The platform can provide new or legacy buildings with a building automation system (BAS) or connect with existing BAS systems in large and small commercial buildings. This platform leverages machine learning algorithms to draw insights from a deployed building’s historical operating data and occupant preferences to save energy (kWh) while increasing occupant comfort. This also allows buildings to reduce peak demand (kW) through direct communication with utilities using demand response protocols such as openADR.
Read more

14 July 2020
Saudi Arabia

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE PES Saudi Arabia talk

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation…

In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

14 July 2020
Spain

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE PES Chapter, Spain

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation…

In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

15 July 2020
Uruguay

Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues
IEEE Uruguay Section

China, US, India, Japan and Russia are the top five countries in terms of electricity generation capacity. Between them they had a total capacity of 3,650 million kW in 2016. In terms of fuel sources for electricity coal, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, renewables and oil provided 38.3%, 22.9%, 16.3%, 10.2%, 9% and 3.3% respectively in 2017. This means almost two-thirds of the global electricity production came from fossil fuels in that year. This is reflected in about 10 billion tons of CO2 from electricity generation or about a third of the global production…

However, this mix is expected to change significantly in the next 10 years. By 2030 installed power generation capacities from wind, solar PV, hydro power, nuclear and thermal are going to reach 540 GW, 420 GW, 530 GW, 160 GW and 1200 GW respectively.  The top five CO2 emitting countries are: China, United States, India, Russian Federation and Japan each producing between nine and one billion metric tons of CO2 in 2016. However, CO2 is not the only concern against global warming. The Global Warming Potentials (GWP) of greenhouse gases are as follows: CO2 (1), Methane (28), Hydro fluorocarbons (138), Nitrous oxide (265), Per fluorocarbons (6,630) and Sulphur hexafluoride (23,500).  So, the bottom line is: Efforts in the electric power sector to replace fossil fuel with renewables and nuclear will help. But if emission from the transportation sector continues to rise, the drop in power sector contributions will not be enough. Large scale Electric Vehicle deployment will help, but question remains – how will the EV be powered.
Read more

16 July 2020
Macedonia

Energy Efficiency in Smart Buildings Through IoT Sensor Integration
IEEE PES Macedonia Chapter Talk

Internet of Things (IoT) deployments offer a much higher value proposition if these can function in the context of smart buildings. Such advanced information and communication technology (ICT) applications in commercial buildings, schools, libraries, shopping centers, etc. offer low cost but highly effective monitoring and control opportunities. Sensors deployed in key locations can monitor the building environment in real-time, collect information for intelligent decision making, and facilitate various services…

An IoT sensor platform has been developed that provides a unified communication platform which can integrate information from disparate sources and provide one control hierarchy. It is a powerful, low-cost, open-architecture software platform that can monitor and control major electrical loads (e.g., HVAC, lighting and plug loads), as well as solar PV systems, energy storage units and other IoT sensors in commercial buildings. The platform can provide new or legacy buildings with a building automation system (BAS) or connect with existing BAS systems in large and small commercial buildings. This platform leverages machine learning algorithms to draw insights from a deployed building’s historical operating data and occupant preferences to save energy (kWh) while increasing occupant comfort. This also allows buildings to reduce peak demand (kW) through direct communication with utilities using demand response protocols such as openADR.
Read more

Upcoming

16 July 2020
UKRI

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE UKRI Section talk

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency.  It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation…

In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks. It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

Upcoming

17 July 2020
Indonesia

Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues
IEEE PES Chapter Indonesia

China, US, India, Japan and Russia are the top five countries in terms of electricity generation capacity. Between them they had a total capacity of 3,650 million kW in 2016. In terms of fuel sources for electricity coal, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, renewables and oil provided 38.3%, 22.9%, 16.3%, 10.2%, 9% and 3.3% respectively in 2017. This means almost two-thirds of the global electricity production came from fossil fuels in that year…

This is reflected in about 10 billion tons of CO2 from electricity generation or about a third of the global production.  However, this mix is expected to change significantly in the next 10 years. By 2030 installed power generation capacities from wind, solar PV, hydro power, nuclear and thermal are going to reach 540 GW, 420 GW, 530 GW, 160 GW and 1200 GW respectively.  The top five CO2 emitting countries are: China, United States, India, Russian Federation and Japan each producing between nine and one billion metric tons of CO2 in 2016. However, CO2 is not the only concern against global warming. The Global Warming Potentials (GWP) of greenhouse gases are as follows: CO2 (1), Methane (28), Hydro fluorocarbons (138), Nitrous oxide (265), Per fluorocarbons (6,630) and Sulphur hexafluoride (23,500).  So, the bottom line is: Efforts in the electric power sector to replace fossil fuel with renewables and nuclear will help. But if emission from the transportation sector continues to rise, the drop in power sector contributions will not be enough. Large scale Electric Vehicle deployment will help, but question remains – how will the EV be powered.
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Upcoming

17 July 2020
New Zealand

Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues
IEEE PES New Zealand Chapter

China, US, India, Japan and Russia are the top five countries in terms of electricity generation capacity. Between them they had a total capacity of 3,650 million kW in 2016. In terms of fuel sources for electricity coal, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, renewables and oil provided 38.3%, 22.9%, 16.3%, 10.2%, 9% and 3.3% respectively in 2017. This means almost two-thirds of the global electricity production came from fossil fuels in that year…

This is reflected in about 10 billion tons of CO2 from electricity generation or about a third of the global production.  However, this mix is expected to change significantly in the next 10 years. By 2030 installed power generation capacities from wind, solar PV, hydro power, nuclear and thermal are going to reach 540 GW, 420 GW, 530 GW, 160 GW and 1200 GW respectively.  The top five CO2 emitting countries are: China, United States, India, Russian Federation and Japan each producing between nine and one billion metric tons of CO2 in 2016. However, CO2 is not the only concern against global warming. The Global Warming Potentials (GWP) of greenhouse gases are as follows: CO2 (1), Methane (28), Hydro fluorocarbons (138), Nitrous oxide (265), Per fluorocarbons (6,630) and Sulphur hexafluoride (23,500).  So, the bottom line is: Efforts in the electric power sector to replace fossil fuel with renewables and nuclear will help. But if emission from the transportation sector continues to rise, the drop in power sector contributions will not be enough. Large scale Electric Vehicle deployment will help, but question remains – how will the EV be powered.
Read more

22 July 2020
Kerala, India

Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues
IEEE Kerala Section Talk

China, US, India, Japan and Russia are the top five countries in terms of electricity generation capacity. Between them they had a total capacity of 3,650 million kW in 2016. In terms of fuel sources for electricity coal, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, renewables and oil provided 38.3%, 22.9%, 16.3%, 10.2%, 9% and 3.3% respectively in 2017. This means almost two-thirds of the global electricity production came from fossil fuels in that year. This is reflected in about 10 billion tons of CO2 from electricity generation or about a third of the global production…

However, this mix is expected to change significantly in the next 10 years. By 2030 installed power generation capacities from wind, solar PV, hydro power, nuclear and thermal are going to reach 540 GW, 420 GW, 530 GW, 160 GW and 1200 GW respectively. The top five CO2 emitting countries are: China, United States, India, Russian Federation and Japan each producing between nine and one billion metric tons of CO2 in 2016. However, CO2 is not the only concern against global warming. The Global Warming Potentials (GWP) of greenhouse gases are as follows: CO2 (1), Methane (28), Hydro fluorocarbons (138), Nitrous oxide (265), Per fluorocarbons (6,630) and Sulphur hexafluoride (23,500). So, the bottom line is: Efforts in the electric power sector to replace fossil fuel with renewables and nuclear will help. But if emission from the transportation sector continues to rise, the drop in power sector contributions will not be enough. Large scale Electric Vehicle deployment will help, but question remains – how will the EV be powered.
Read more

Upcoming

22 July 2020
South Africa

Energy Efficiency in Smart Buildings Through IoT Sensor Integration
IEEE/SAIEE, South Africa

Internet of Things (IoT) deployments offer a much higher value proposition if these can function in the context of smart buildings. Such advanced information and communication technology (ICT) applications in commercial buildings, schools, libraries, shopping centers, etc. offer low cost but highly effective monitoring and control opportunities…

Sensors deployed in key locations can monitor the building environment in real-time, collect information for intelligent decision making, and facilitate various services. An IoT sensor platform has been developed that provides a unified communication platform which can integrate information from disparate sources and provide one control hierarchy. It is a powerful, low-cost, open-architecture software platform that can monitor and control major electrical loads (e.g., HVAC, lighting and plug loads), as well as solar PV systems, energy storage units and other IoT sensors in commercial buildings. The platform can provide new or legacy buildings with a building automation system (BAS) or connect with existing BAS systems in large and small commercial buildings. This platform leverages machine learning algorithms to draw insights from a deployed building’s historical operating data and occupant preferences to save energy (kWh) while increasing occupant comfort. This also allows buildings to reduce peak demand (kW) through direct communication with utilities using demand response protocols such as openADR.
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Upcoming

25 July 2020
Bhubaneswar, India

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE Bhubaneswar Sub-section and IEEE PES Bhubaneswar Chapter

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation. In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks…

It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
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Upcoming

27 July 2020
Brazil

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE Brazil-Bahia Section Talk

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation. In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks…

It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

Upcoming

29 July 2020
South Africa

Global Electric Power Sector: Engaging with Environmental Issues
IEEE/SAIEE South Africa

China, US, India, Japan and Russia are the top five countries in terms of electricity generation capacity. Between them they had a total capacity of 3,650 million kW in 2016. In terms of fuel sources for electricity coal, natural gas, hydro, nuclear, renewables and oil provided 38.3%, 22.9%, 16.3%, 10.2%, 9% and 3.3% respectively in 2017. This means almost two-thirds of the global electricity production came from fossil fuels in that year…

This is reflected in about 10 billion tons of CO2 from electricity generation or about a third of the global production.  However, this mix is expected to change significantly in the next 10 years. By 2030 installed power generation capacities from wind, solar PV, hydro power, nuclear and thermal are going to reach 540 GW, 420 GW, 530 GW, 160 GW and 1200 GW respectively.  The top five CO2 emitting countries are: China, United States, India, Russian Federation and Japan each producing between nine and one billion metric tons of CO2 in 2016. However, CO2 is not the only concern against global warming. The Global Warming Potentials (GWP) of greenhouse gases are as follows: CO2 (1), Methane (28), Hydro fluorocarbons (138), Nitrous oxide (265), Per fluorocarbons (6,630) and Sulphur hexafluoride (23,500).  So, the bottom line is: Efforts in the electric power sector to replace fossil fuel with renewables and nuclear will help. But if emission from the transportation sector continues to rise, the drop in power sector contributions will not be enough. Large scale Electric Vehicle deployment will help, but question remains – how will the EV be powered.
Read more

Upcoming

08 August 2020
Bhubaneswar, India

How to Write an Effective Technical Paper
IEEE Bhubaneswar Sub-section and IEEE PES Bhubaneswar Chapter

In this presentation Prof. Saifur Rahman will highlight issues with paper structure, conference vs. journal papers, ethics, where to publish, open access, impact factor, etc. He will also highlight the IEEE publications business, the value and quality of IEEE publications, and the broad topical areas IEEE publications cover.

Upcoming

13 August 2020
South Africa

Role of the Smart Grid in Facilitating the Integration of Renewables
IEEE/SAIEE, South Africa

With the focus on environmental sustainability and energy security, power system planners are looking at renewable energy as supplements and alternatives. But such generation sources have their own challenges – primarily intermittency. It is expected that the smart grid – due to its inherent communication, sensing and control capabilities – will have the ability to manage the load, storage and generation assets (including renewables) in the power grid to enable a large-scale integration of distributed generation. In a smart grid, information about the state of the grid and its components can be exchanged quickly over long distances and complex networks…

It will therefore be possible to have the integration of sustainable energy sources, such as wind, solar, off-shore electricity, etc. for smoother system operation. But in order for this to be possible, the electric utility will have to evolve, and change their ways of operation to become an intelligent provider of these services. This lecture introduces the operational characteristics of renewable energy sources, and various aspects of the smart grid – technology, standards and regulations. It also addresses the interplay among distributed generation, storage and conventional generation to provide an efficient operational strategy in the context of the smart grid.
Read more

Upcoming